1850s

Henry and Clement Studebaker open the H & C Studebaker blacksmith shop at the corner of Michigan and Jefferson Streets in downtown South Bend.

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H & C Studebaker Blacksmith shop opens - 1852

Henry and Clement Studebaker open the H & C Studebaker blacksmith shop at the corner of Michigan and Jefferson Streets in downtown South Bend.

John M. Studebaker joins the firm, buying elder brother Henry’s share of the business.

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John M. Studebaker joins the firm - 1858

John M. Studebaker joins the firm, buying elder brother Henry’s share of the business.

1870s

A devastating fire destroys over half of the Studebaker plant. The company promptly rebuilds.

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Studebaker plant fire - 1872

A devastating fire destroys over half of the Studebaker plant. The company promptly rebuilds.

1880s

Clement Studebaker commissions noted architect Henry Ives Cobb to design his new home Tippecanoe Place. The forty-room mansion is completed in 1888.

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Tippecanoe Place commissioned - 1885

Clement Studebaker commissions noted architect Henry Ives Cobb to design his new home Tippecanoe Place. The forty-room mansion is completed in 1888.

1910s

The Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company acquires the Everitt-Metzker-Flanders Company of Detroit to form The Studebaker Corporation. Electric vehicle production is halted.

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Studebaker acquires Everitt-Metzker-Flanders Company - 1911

The Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company acquires the Everitt-Metzker-Flanders Company of Detroit to form The Studebaker Corporation. Electric vehicle production is halted.

1920s

Studebaker discontinues all horse-drawn vehicle production and begins transferring automobile production from Detroit to South Bend.   A 1920 Light Six is Studebaker’s first South Bend-built automobile.

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Light Six is Studebaker’s first South Bend-built automobile - 1920

Studebaker discontinues all horse-drawn vehicle production and begins transferring automobile production from Detroit to South Bend.   A 1920 Light Six is Studebaker’s first South Bend-built automobile.

Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne takes part-time employment in Studebaker’s Sales Department. Rockne served as a Studebaker spokesman until his death in 1931.

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Knute Rockne Joins as part-time sales - 1928

Notre Dame football coach Knute Rockne takes part-time employment in Studebaker’s Sales Department. Rockne served as a Studebaker spokesman until his death in 1931.

1930s

Studebaker enters a five-car factory-backed team at the Indianapolis 500.   Studebaker Special #22 driven by Cliff Bergere leads the team with a 3rd place finish.

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Studebaker enters a five-car team at the Indianapolis 500 - 1932

Studebaker enters a five-car factory-backed team at the Indianapolis 500.   Studebaker Special #22 driven by Cliff Bergere leads the team with a 3rd place finish.

Studebaker enters receivership and teeters on the brink of closing. The company reorganizes and resumes production under court supervision. President Albert Erskine is relieved of his duties.

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Studebaker enters receivership and teeters on the brink of closing - 1933

Studebaker enters receivership and teeters on the brink of closing. The company reorganizes and resumes production under court supervision. President Albert Erskine is relieved of his duties.

Studebaker successfully emerges from receivership with a city-wide celebration - 1935

Studebaker retains Raymond Loewy Associates - 1936

Studebaker retains Raymond Loewy Associates to head its Design Department

The Studebaker Champion is introduced - 1939

1940s

Studebaker begins retooling for wartime production - 1942

Studebaker produces its last prewar automobile on January 31 and begins retooling for wartime production.   The company produced US6 Army trucks, the Weasel, and Wright-Cyclone radial engines for the B17 bomber

Studebaker is “First by Far with a Postwar Car.” The company’s new 1947 Champions and Commanders debut in May and feature radical styling by Raymond Loewy Associates. Studebaker establishes itself as a styling leader.

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Studebaker is “First by Far with a Postwar Car” - 1946

Studebaker is “First by Far with a Postwar Car.” The company’s new 1947 Champions and Commanders debut in May and feature radical styling by Raymond Loewy Associates. Studebaker establishes itself as a styling leader.

1950s

Studebaker introduces its iconic “Bullet Nose” look - 1950

Studebaker introduces its iconic “bullet nose” look.   A company-record 343, 166 automobiles are produced in 1950.

Studebaker Celebrates its centennial - 1952

Studebaker’s Starliner hardtop debuts to critical acclaim. The award-winning design was penned by Raymond Loewy Associates’ Robert Bourke.

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Studebaker’s Starliner hardtop debuts to critical acclaim - 1953

Studebaker’s Starliner hardtop debuts to critical acclaim. The award-winning design was penned by Raymond Loewy Associates’ Robert Bourke.

The Studebaker Corporation and the Packard Motor Car Company join forces to form The Studebaker-Packard Corporation.

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The Studebaker-Packard Corporation is formed - 1954

The Studebaker Corporation and the Packard Motor Car Company join forces to form The Studebaker-Packard Corporation.

The Hawk line debuts for the 1956 model year - 1955

The Packard line is discontinued; the Lark is introduced as a 1959 model.

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The Lark is introduced as a 1959 model - 1958

The Packard line is discontinued; the Lark is introduced as a 1959 model.

1960s

The Studebaker Avanti debuts in late April - 1962

The Studebaker Corporation closes its South Bend plant in December. Production continues at Studebaker’s Hamilton, Ontario, factory.

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The Studebaker Corporation closes its South Bend plant in December - 1963

The Studebaker Corporation closes its South Bend plant in December. Production continues at Studebaker’s Hamilton, Ontario, factory.

The last Studebaker leaves the Hamilton plant on March 17. The Studebaker Corporation’s vehicle collection and company archives are given to the City of South Bend.

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The last Studebaker leaves the Hamilton plant on March 17 - 1966

The last Studebaker leaves the Hamilton plant on March 17. The Studebaker Corporation’s vehicle collection and company archives are given to the City of South Bend.